East Screen West Screen #67 – Love and Other Probable Plot Uses

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Running Time (1:21:28)

NEWS:
  1. THE HOBBIT titles and release dates announced (Facebook)
  2. China opens mega cartoon factory (FilmBiz Asia)
  3. Huayi unveils $460m theme park plans (FilmBiz Asia)
  4. Panda artist calls for boycott (m1905)
  5. Nic and Cecelia split (rumors)

EAST SCREEN:

  • A BEAUTIFUL LIFE [不再讓你孤單] – TRAILER

Interlude – Love Bites – Def Leopard (Amazon Link)

 

WEST SCREEN:

  • LOVE AND OTHER IMPOSSIBLE PURSUITS (a.k.a. THE OTHER WOMAN – TRAILER

 

NEXT EPISODE (#68) –

VIRTUAL RECALL [異空危情]

THE HANGOVER 2

X-MEN: FIRST CLASS

You can email the show at eastscreen at gmail.com


2 thoughts on “East Screen West Screen #67 – Love and Other Probable Plot Uses”

  1. I guess it makes sense to bring familiar LotR actors back for The Hobbit in terms of the box office. But given how bloated these movies are to begin with, it seems odd to introduce characters and scenes that aren’t in the original story. (especially if they end up cutting significant Hobbit content from the film)

    I kind of feel that The Hobbit movies should be able to stand on their own, much like the book. I read it with no idea of what was to come. If they cut to Mount Doom or the Battle of Pelennor Fields every 10 minutes I think it could trivialize the original tale. (“Hey, look… a ring!” DUN-DUN-DUN!!!! [Fade to 20-minute flash forward])

    P.S.: Not saying it’s a good one, but “An Unexpected Journey” is probably a play on the first chapter title, “An Unexpected Party.”

  2. My network’s been down since last Friday so I’ve been a bit behind lately. But before you go on to record your next episode, I’d like to point out that a reliable Chinese movie site indicated that the film “Virtual Recall” which you guys are scheduled to review on your podcast might actually be an older film that’s been shelved for years before its actual release.

    To prove their point, some of the stars in this film like Mandy Chiang has since retired from the Hong Kong entertainment industry and is currently running a clothing store in Taiwan. Word on the street is, it’s actually doing pretty well. Stephen Fung doesn’t really do any on-screen acting anymore. I believe he is too busy dealing with his own production company and working as a producer these days.

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